INTENSIFYING PLACES: Transit-Oriented Urban Design for Resilient Cities

ASPECT insights
INTENSIFYING PLACES: Transit-Oriented Urban Design for Resilient Cities

INTENSIFYING PLACES: Transit-Oriented Urban Design for Resilient Cities

The Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage projects were announced on Wednesday 23 June 2010. ASPECT Studios is pleased to reveal that the ‘Intensifying Places’ project, on which we are one of the partners, has been funded more than $400,000 over the next three years. The Intensifying Places project looks at the most significant urban design challenge facing Australian cities: the transformation necessary to meet carbon reduction targets. Good transit-oriented development creates high levels of urban amenity, access and equity along with dramatically reduced car dependency. Such development hinges upon the quality of urban design and architectural outcomes in aesthetic, social and economic as well as environmental terms. This project will investigate and simulate a series of such scenarios in the Melbourne metropolitan area, exploring a range of building types, morphologies and design approaches. These scenarios will be tested for community resistance, design quality, market viability and the necessary forms of urban governance. The list of partners for the project include the Department of Planning and Community Development (DPCD), Victorian Government Architect’s Office (VGAO), the Cities of Melbourne, Moreland and Darebin and corporate partners David Lock Associates, MGS Architects and ASPECT Studios. Shane Murray (Monash University) and Kim Dovey (University of Melbourne) are the Chief Investigators together with Rob Adams (City of Melbourne) and Geoffrey London (VGAO) as Partner Investigators. ASPECT Studios will be providing its interactive media services (modelling and consulting) on the project. In addition, the project investigators will utilise the ASPECT Studios 3D Viewer to view and simulate scenarios in a virtual world. To discover more about the ASPECT Studios 3D Viewer, click here. Return to News