Nature Play QLD

ASPECT insights
Nature Play QLD
NATUREPLAY_ASPECTSTUDIOS5   As a human-focused studio committed to designing for people both big and small, we were thrilled to be part of a recent panel of local thought leaders to help develop a roadmap for a children’s nature play in the early childhood space.   Nature Play QLD invited us to participate in an initial workshop to test and discuss the materials and format that will shape future nature play workshops.   We have great respect for Nature Play QLD – they aim to increase the time Queensland kids spend in unstructured play outdoors and in nature and the organisation is founded on the principal that this kind of nature play is fundamental to a healthy and fulfilling childhood. Supported by the Queensland Government, Nature Play QLD works with partner groups to encourage the Queensland community to see the value of nature play and to support families to make it a priority in children’s lives.   The organisation is inspired by the ideas of American social commentator and founder of the Children & Nature Network, Richard Louv. Richard is also an author of numerous books that have helped launch an international movement to connect children and their families to nature.   Nature Play QLD’s programs include Nature Family Clubs, which are made up of families that come together to share outdoor adventures and re-connect with nature. The Neighbourhood Nature Play program is another initiative - it aims to reverse the trend toward greater indoor, highly structured, technologically immersed play spaces and reinstate largely outdoor, social and community orientated play for kids.   Our Brisbane Studio Director, Deb Robbins was part of the recent nature play project workshop. Her presentation was based on experiences in nature play administration and how early childhood settings can be organised and programs implemented. She discussed the nuts and bolts of getting the nature play program off the ground. Buzzing with the potential of human spirit, she looked at what may be possible for the future of early childhood spaces and compared it with what is already in place to encourage nature play for kids. The conclusion was that it is indeed time for a change.   Deb reminded other members of the panel that a good play space evolves and is never really finished. We look forward to being part of this ongoing journey to improve the way children interact with the natural spaces around them. Return to News   NATUREPLAY_ASPECTSTUDIOS3 NATUREPLAY_ASPECTSTUDIOS2